Florida Newspaper History Timeline 1783–2021

Our state’s evolving life has been mirrored in the pages of our newspapers, even as the landscape of Florida journalism grew, flourished, contracted, changed, and continues to transform. This excerpt is from a chronology that is part of the University of South Florida library’s digital collection. You can also download it here. By David Shedden 1783 - 19001783 The Treaty of Paris between Great Britain and the United States ends

The power of being seen

Since 1873, Florida’s Black newspapers have advocated, informed, and reflected lives often ignored By Kenya Woodard Featured image above: Josiah Walls, born enslaved in 1842, was a man of firsts – among them, owner/publisher of Florida’s first Black newspaper and the first Black man to serve his state in the U.S. Congress. Yet when he died in 1905 in Tallahassee, no state newspaper carried his obituary. It was with those

Anything is possible

A conversation with Florida Humanities’ new Executive Director Nashid Madyun By Jacki Levine and Keith Simmons Featured image above:  “The ability to know your neighbor helps you truly know yourself and, ultimately, contribute to a fair and vibrant society,” says Nashid Madyun, photographed on the grounds of the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Long before Dr. Nashid Madyun became Florida Humanities’ new executive director in May, he had witnessed

An evening with Danielle Allen

Harvard University professor. Political theorist. Classicist. Author. Director of a center for ethics. Scholar on democracy, ancient Athenian and modern. By Jacki Levine Featured image above: Photographed here for a 2016 profile for Harvard Magazine, Danielle Allen is currently on leave from Harvard as she pursues the Democratic nomination for governor of Massachusetts. Her book, Democracy in the Time of Coronavirus, is due out in December. Danielle Allen’s head-turning list

Forgotten newspaper casts light on painful stories from Miami’s past

Ten years ago, Julio Capo was researching his book on Miami’s LGBTQ history before 1940 when he discovered a long-forgotten alternative weekly newspaper, Miami Life. By Janet Scherberger Featured image above: Miami Life used attention-grabbing headlines to challenge some of the most powerful state, local and national institutions of the time. “In the state archives I kept coming across references to this newspaper,” said Capo, who formerly worked in TV

Let’s Talk About Water

Florida Humanities is partnering with seven locations across Florida to bring the Smithsonian “Water/Ways” exhibit back to the state. “Water/Ways” is part of the Smithsonian’s Museum on Main Street (MoMS) program that brings nationally curated exhibits to small communities across America. Communities hosting the exhibition have an opportunity to dive into water — an essential component of life on our planet environmentally, culturally, and historically. By Janet Scherberger Featured image

How a powerful partnership between newspapers and educators ignites learning

Since the 1930s, when New York City school teachers requested delivery of The New York Times to their classrooms, newspapers have served as a tool for instruction in everything from reading, history, and government, to math and economics. By Janet Scherberger Today, there are more than 950 Newspaper in Education programs in cities throughout the United States, serving nearly 40 percent of the nation’s public school students. The program promotes
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