Let’s Talk About Water

Florida Humanities is partnering with seven locations across Florida to bring the Smithsonian “Water/Ways” exhibit back to the state. “Water/Ways” is part of the Smithsonian’s Museum on Main Street (MoMS) program that brings nationally curated exhibits to small communities across America. Communities hosting the exhibition have an opportunity to dive into water — an essential component of life on our planet environmentally, culturally, and historically. By Janet Scherberger Featured image

How a powerful partnership between newspapers and educators ignites learning

Since the 1930s, when New York City school teachers requested delivery of The New York Times to their classrooms, newspapers have served as a tool for instruction in everything from reading, history, and government, to math and economics. By Janet Scherberger Today, there are more than 950 Newspaper in Education programs in cities throughout the United States, serving nearly 40 percent of the nation’s public school students. The program promotes

A history museum with an intriguing past

Linda Kranert, museum coordinator for the Apalachicola Arsenal Museum, first saw the building back in 1993, when she was touring the grounds of Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee after being hired as a medical unit supervisor there. By Janet Scherberger Featured image above: The history museum includes a log from the mid 1800s when the buildings were used as a penitentiary. The hospital itself was once part of a 10-building

Under the gaze of the sun

How Florida’s newspapers grew, prospered, and struggled in a state rich in stories By Gary R. Mormino and David Shedden Featured image above: Mabel Norris Reese, owner and editor of the Mount Dora Topic newspaper, was a civil rights activist as well as a journalist. Her editorial questioning the local sheriff’s shooting of two of the “Groveland Boys,” four young Black men wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in

From Victim to Victor: Jackie Robinson at 100

Airdate: July 22, 2021 On the 100th anniversary of his birth, we discussed the impact of Jackie Robinson breaking Major League Baseball’s color barrier in 1947 – why it was such a momentous breakthrough, how it laid the groundwork for the subsequent success of the civil rights movement, and what we can still learn from Robinson’s example today. We were joined by Jackie Robinson’s cousin, Dr. Linda Walden, Fred Flowers, who

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