• A New Window to the Past

    By: Cindy Bear, Guest Contributor In 1926 one person prevented the final destruction of a massive sand mound used as a burial place by the Calusa people from about A.D. 1000 to 1700. Now, the story of Captain John Smith is shared on an interpretive sign at the Randell Research

    Read more

  • How do the humanities anchor democracy?

    How do the humanities anchor democracy? We may live in a STEM-focused world, but the humanities remain crucial in helping us understand one another. And that is key to sustaining our democracy, writes Steve Seibert, our executive director. Read his thought-provoking essay, below. In Praise of the Humanities By Steven

    Read more

  • How a beloved author learned to love Christmas in Florida

    How a beloved author learned to love Christmas in Florida “It seemed to me that my first Christmas at Cross Creek would break my heart,” wrote Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, a journalist who left Upstate New York in 1928 for the wilds of the Florida subtropics. Rawlings, who became one of

    Read more

  • How a worldly little lime found fame in Florida

    How a worldly little lime found fame in Florida After a winding journey some 500 years ago, a small, tart lime arrived in the Florida Keys. It had started out in southern Asia and was carried by Arabs across North Africa into Portugal and Spain. Explorers brought it to the

    Read more

  • Florida Stories Walking Tours Launching Soon

    Florida Stories Walking Tours Listen. These streets have stories to tell. Take a stroll through history with our free walking tours as your guide. Just download our Florida Stories walking tour app to your phone or mobile device. You’ll meet the dreamers and adventurers, citrus farmers, cattle ranchers, families, individualists,

    Read more

  • A Historian’s Dreamland

    By Gary R. Mormino In 1977, Ybor City was in steep decline. Few of the original inhabitants of this once-vibrant ethnic community remained. Seventh Avenue was a shadow of the thriving commercial center of years past—and ghost-like at night. But to a young historian, this weathered and wearied enclave was

    Read more

  • Meet Zora

    Who was Zora Neale Hurston? Get to know this singular woman, author of one of Florida’s greatest novels, Their Eyes Were Watching God; an independent spirit who didn’t let 1930s-era racial and socioeconomic obstacles stifle her creative genius; a folklorist who captured back-roads songs, stories, and otherwise-unrecorded lives in the

    Read more

  • What is a Florida Cracker?

    What is a Florida Cracker? Florida folk singers will tell you all about the tough Scots-Irish pioneers who tamed the Florida frontier. They are the great grandparents of today’s Crackers. What did they eat and how did they survive here more than 200 years ago? How does their culture endure

    Read more

  • How Florida became the state to watch

    Over the past half century, Florida has changed from solidly Democratic to a two-party state that media, candidates, and analysts watch closely to see which way the nation’s political winds will blow. How did this happen? Why, going into the 2016 election year, does Florida qualify as a premier swing

    Read more

  • How did Florida’s Highwaymen artists succeed despite segregation?

    As Florida’s population boomed in the 1950s, 26 African Americans—all self-taught landscape painters—succeeded despite Jim Crow racial and cultural barriers. They painted and sold idyllic depictions of natural Florida door-to-door and from the trunks of their cars along the East Coast. Today, known as The Highwaymen, they are honored for

    Read more

image_pdfimage_print