Mapping the Black Imaginary: Race, Space, and Power

Julian Chambliss delivered a keynote lecture at the 2019 Digital Humanities Forum at the University of Kansas. During the lecture, Dr. Chambliss discussed “Mapping Black Imaginaries and Geographies”, a new project within the Consortium for Critical Diversity in a Digital Age (CEDAR). A resource from the Faith and Folklore: Sites and Black Women’s Stories in the 20th Century webinar from March 5, 2021.

Beyond the Black Panther: Visions of Afrofuturism in American Comics

Julian Chambliss, one of the participating panelists of the conversation series, curated an exhibit on Black Panther and Afrofuturism. Many of the themes discussed in the exhibit resonate with the work of Zora Neale Hurston and the notion of African Americans imagining a future different from the Jim Crow era. A resource from the Faith and Folklore: Sites and Black Women’s Stories in the 20th Century webinar from March 5, 2021.

Water as A Divider: When Beaches Were Not For All

Water is the symbol of many things — renewal, rebirth, life itself. But in the Jim Crow South, it was a stark physical reminder of an enforced separation. Parting the Waters In the bleak years of segregation, Florida beaches and pools were symbols of a great divide — and of rising up through persistent struggle. By Audrey Peterman As a Jamaican woman who developed a passion for nature at the

Telling the story of a beloved bay

Florida Bay Forever harnesses the power of the narrative to protect this threatened lifeblood of the Keys. By Jacki Levine When Emma Haydocy talks about Florida Bay, the life-brimming estuary that links Everglades National Park with the Florida Keys, the Massachusetts native evokes an almost poetic vision of nature’s beauty. “There are no words that can adequately describe the experience of being out on Florida Bay when the water is glass and

Someplace so familiar

Traveling halfway around the world, this sponge diver found his home in Tarpon Springs — a vibrant seaside outpost of his native Greece. By Janet Scherberger It’s a breezy, clear-blue-sky early afternoon in Tarpon Springs and Anastasio “Taso” Karistinos is on his sponge boat, stringing up a gray tarp to protect against the sun. “I don’t need to get more tan,” he says with a broad grin, his white teeth