Presented By Andrew Frank

This talk explores how Osceola became a national phenomenon after his death in the nineteenth century.  It includes an overview of the war as well as a discussion of Osceola’s place in the Second Seminole War.  The talk then turns to a discussion of the debates that occurred in the United States over Indian wars,  Indian removal, and their connections to American slavery.   In this context, we learn about how Osceola has been remembered and misremembered since his capture and death.  Special attention is paid to the role of anti-war and abolitionist activists in promoting and fabricating a series of enduring myths about him.

Andrew K. Frank is a specialist in the history of the Seminoles and other Indians of Florida.  He is Allen Morris Associate Professor of History at Florida State University and an award-winning author and editor of many books and articles.  His books include Creeks and Southerners: Biculturalism on the Early American Frontier (2005) and The Seminole (The History and Culture of Native Americans) (2010).   He is currently finishing Those Who Camp at a Distance: The Seminoles and Indians of Florida—a synthesis of the history of the Seminoles from their origin until the present.

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Andrew Frank


Presented By Rachel Wentz

Explore one of the most ancient, well-preserved archaeological sites in North America. The 7,000-year-old Windover archaeological site was a pond used for the interment of the dead and produced over 160 individuals whose analyses have provided insight into the life and health of people during Florida’s Archaic period.

Dr. Rachel Wentz graduated from Florida State University with a PhD in Anthropology and specializes in the analysis of human remains with foci on ancient disease and population health. Her master’s thesis was an analysis of fracture frequencies among the Windover skeletal population; a 7,000-year-old site in Titusville, FL. Her doctoral dissertation was a bioarchaeological assessment of the same population. Dr. Wentz has also analyzed remains from Little Salt Spring and Calico Hill, both prehistoric sites in Florida. She has done skeletal work in St. Croix, England, and Ukraine and obtained experience in forensics at the C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory at the University of Florida. She has taught courses in physical anthropology, human osteology and forensic anthropology at Florida State University and serves on the Brevard County Historical Commission. Today Dr. Wentz is a Regional Director of the Florida Public Archaeology Network.

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Rachel Wentz


Presented By Rosalyn Howard

African slaves have often risked life and limb to escape southern slavery, but their options for sanctuary were extremely limited. Some fled to the Caribbean, while others fled south and joined forces with another group of freedom-seekers: the Seminoles. Dr. Rosalyn Howard will examine the African influence on Florida’s iconic tribe, as well as the related Caribbean diaspora.

Professor Rosalyn Howard is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the North American Indian Studies Program at the University of Central Florida.   She specializes in Cultural Anthropology and her primary area of research is ethnohistorical studies of the African Diaspora with a focus on the interrelationships formed by African and Indigenous peoples in the Americas and the Caribbean.

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Rosalyn Howard


Presented By Andrew Frank

Between 1700 and the present, the culture of the Florida Seminoles has remained remarkably connected to its roots while also innovating in dramatic fashion.  This lecture explores this dynamic to show how the Seminoles have embraced this dualism of being both modern and traditional.  It examines, among other things, their origin stories, dress, cuisine, housing, ceremonial life, and family life.

Andrew K. Frank is a specialist in the history of the Seminoles and other Indians of Florida.  He is Allen Morris Associate Professor of History at Florida State University and an award-winning author and editor of many books and articles.  His books include Creeks and Southerners: Biculturalism on the Early American Frontier (2005) and The Seminole (The History and Culture of Native Americans) (2010).   He is currently finishing Those Who Camp at a Distance: The Seminoles and Indians of Florida—a synthesis of the history of the Seminoles from their origin until the present.

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Andrew Frank