Let’s Talk About Water

Florida Humanities is partnering with seven locations across Florida to bring the Smithsonian “Water/Ways” exhibit back to the state. “Water/Ways” is part of the Smithsonian’s Museum on Main Street (MoMS) program that brings nationally curated exhibits to small communities across America. Communities hosting the exhibition have an opportunity to dive into water — an essential component of life on our planet environmentally, culturally, and historically. By Janet Scherberger Featured image

How a powerful partnership between newspapers and educators ignites learning

Since the 1930s, when New York City school teachers requested delivery of The New York Times to their classrooms, newspapers have served as a tool for instruction in everything from reading, history, and government, to math and economics. By Janet Scherberger Today, there are more than 950 Newspaper in Education programs in cities throughout the United States, serving nearly 40 percent of the nation’s public school students. The program promotes

A history museum with an intriguing past

Linda Kranert, museum coordinator for the Apalachicola Arsenal Museum, first saw the building back in 1993, when she was touring the grounds of Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee after being hired as a medical unit supervisor there. By Janet Scherberger Featured image above: The history museum includes a log from the mid 1800s when the buildings were used as a penitentiary. The hospital itself was once part of a 10-building

Under the gaze of the sun

How Florida’s newspapers grew, prospered, and struggled in a state rich in stories By Gary R. Mormino and David Shedden Featured image above: Mabel Norris Reese, owner and editor of the Mount Dora Topic newspaper, was a civil rights activist as well as a journalist. Her editorial questioning the local sheriff’s shooting of two of the “Groveland Boys,” four young Black men wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in

2021 Florida Magazine Association | Charlie Awards

Congratulations to our very own FORUM magazine and all the amazing folks whose talents are displayed in the pages! On Friday, July 16, 2021, at the Florida Magazine Association Charlie Awards Banquet in Sarasota, FORUM magazine was named Best Magazine in its category — among 14 awards, including 8 first-place “Charlies.” Featured image above: Florida Humanities Executive Director, Nashid Madyun, and FORUM Magazine Editor, Jacki Levine, attend the 2021 FMA

Twilight of the Spanish, 1780s – 1821: Reading List

Historian Dr. Brian Rucker  offers this reading list for those who would like to learn more about the events leading up to Spain handing over Florida to the U.S. Belko, William S., ed.  America’s Hundred Years’ War:  U.S. Expansion to the Gulf Coast and the Fate of the Seminole, 1763-1858.  Gainesville:  University Press of Florida, 2011. Brooks, Philip Coolidge.  Diplomacy and the Borderlands – the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819. Berkeley: 

When you leave the beaten path….

History, and a few quirky surprises, await on the backroads of our state By Ron Cunningham Featured image above: Countless red bricks remain on the old Dixie Highway as it runs from Espanola through piney woods into Putnam County. A red-brick road into the past, a lighthouse at the edge of the world, a vanishing waterfall, an improbable aluminum castle and a forgotten Civil War fortification. Those are five out-of-the-way

Twilight of the Spanish, 1780s-1821

How Florida became part of the United States By Brian R. Rucker Featured image above: Andrew Jackson Spain lost its colony of Florida to England, in 1763, after the French and Indian War/Seven Years War. By the time it reacquired Florida from Britain 20 years later with the Treaty of Paris, Spain was no longer the great European colonial power it had once been. By 1821, Spain would transfer its
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