Mapping the Black Imaginary: Race, Space, and Power

Julian Chambliss delivered a keynote lecture at the 2019 Digital Humanities Forum at the University of Kansas. During the lecture, Dr. Chambliss discussed “Mapping Black Imaginaries and Geographies”, a new project within the Consortium for Critical Diversity in a Digital Age (CEDAR). A resource from the Faith and Folklore: Sites and Black Women’s Stories in the 20th Century webinar from March 5, 2021.

Beyond the Black Panther: Visions of Afrofuturism in American Comics

Julian Chambliss, one of the participating panelists of the conversation series, curated an exhibit on Black Panther and Afrofuturism. Many of the themes discussed in the exhibit resonate with the work of Zora Neale Hurston and the notion of African Americans imagining a future different from the Jim Crow era. A resource from the Faith and Folklore: Sites and Black Women’s Stories in the 20th Century webinar from March 5, 2021.

Excellence with Caring: The History of Florida A&M University

The passage of the 19th Amendment granted women the right to vote. Despite the constitutional security granted by the amendment, Black women–and Black men–were not able to exercise voting privileges. This did not prevent Black women from engaging in political organizing and registering others to vote. When Black women were finally able to vote with the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Black women began to enter national politics in force.

Written In Water, Florida’s story–and ours

By Jacki Levine Featured image above: A colorful sunset provides a dramatic backdrop to silhouettes of mangroves in the Ten Thousand Islands, the beginnings of the Everglades. Photo by Alex Freeze. It is said when Ponce de Leon’s expedition made landfall on our east coast in April 1513, he named the region “La Florida,” after both the lush, flowering vegetation greeting him onshore, and “Pascua Florida,” the Easter season he
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