Events Calendar

In local communities across Florida, humanities-rich programming is making a lasting impact in the hearts and minds of Sunshine State residents and visitors alike. Florida Humanities is proud to partner with local community champions to bring you high-quality public programming through Community Project Grants, Florida Talks, Museum on Main Street, and more.

Alert: Some events may be canceled or postponed. We work to ensure that our events calendar remains accurate. We strongly urge you to call the event contact for any program you are interested in to confirm that the event is still planned.

The Ocoee Florida Massacre

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

The Pinellas County African American History Museum presents "The Ocoee Florida Massacre" by professor Vincent Adejumo. Ocoee is a small town in west Orange county first settled in the 1850s. On November 2, 1920, July Perry and Mose Norman, both of whom were Black, attempted to vote at the local polling stations. However, the Klu Klux Klan attacked and killed multiple Black citizens of the town. This presentation investigates the

Bloody Streets and Crooked Lines: 100 Years of Black Voter Suppression in Florida

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

The Pinellas County African American History Museum presents "Bloody Streets and Crooked Lines: 100 Years of Black Voter Suppression in Florida" by editor James Abraham. From the violent and fatal 1921 election riots in Ocoee through modern redistricting issues, this presentation explores voter suppression in Florida over 100 years and the prime figures in the struggle for full and equal access to the polls. James Abraham is a former journalist

Florida Maroons and Black Seminole Society

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

The Pinellas County African American History Museum presents "Florida Maroons and Black Seminole Society" by professor Anthony Dixon. This presentation examines the history and culture of the Florida Maroons and Black Seminoles. Dr. Dixon discusses the origins and lives of both the Maroons and their development into the Black Seminoles from the 16th through 19th centuries. This presentation also includes an examination of the direct relationship between Black Seminoles and

The Destruction of Rosewood

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

The city of Rosewood was settled in 1845 and became an all-black town by the turn of the twentieth century. However, during the first week of January in 1923, the city burned to the ground in an act of domestic terrorism. This presentation critically analyzes Rosewood and other majority Black cities in Florida. Registration and an admission fee are not required to attend. Dr. Vincent Edward Oluwole Adejumo is currently

The African Diaspora Experience in Florida

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

Florida has a relationship with Africans and the Diaspora unlike any other state. This presentation chronologically examines this relationship beginning in the sixteenth century through the present day and provides a broad overview of the African Diaspora experience in Florida, highlighting both the pitfalls and the triumphs within Florida history. Registration and admission are not required to attend. Dr. Dixon is the President of Archival and Historical Research Associated and

Remembering Paradise Park

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

In 1949, during the Jim Crow era, Silver Springs' owners Carl Ray and Shorty Davidson did something unique: they created a place for African-American tourists. Located downriver, they dubbed their creation "Paradise Park for Colored People." From 1949 to 1969, the former Silver Springs boat captain Eddie Vereen ran one of the most popular places for African Americans to visit in the country. Registration and admission are not required to

The Civil Rights Movement in Florida

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

The idea that Florida did not experience the tumult of other Deep South states during the Civil Rights movement is a popular misconception. This presentation debunks the myth of "Florida exceptionalism" in relationship to the Black freedom struggle and demonstrates that the state experienced many of the features that characterized more well-known areas and demonstrates how this history remains relevant in modern America- for better and worse. Dr. J. Michael

Making a Way Out of No Way

Pinellas County African American History Museum 1101 Marshall Street, Clearwater, FL, United States

"Making a Way Out of No Way" is a popular African-American expression. Dr. Bireda, portraying pioneer Queen Andrews, answers questions posed by W.E.B DuBois regarding the agency and joy expressed by African-Americans during Jim Crow, including the values, virtues, creativity, and resilience in the community. Dr. Martha Bireda is the Director of the Blanchard House Museum of African American History and Culture of Charlotte County. For over 25 years, she

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