Stories of Florida-Con Sabor!

Our stories have never been the same since Ponce De Leon first arrived on our shores in 1513. These personal, historical, and traditional Florida tales will take us on a journey into the imagination that connects the people and cultures of Florida, with a bit of Latino flavor! This program is a partnership between Florida Humanities and the Pinellas County Historical Society. Funding for this program was provided by Florida

Jubilee in the Jungle

Join Sacred Lands Preservation and Education for the official unveiling of two new adventures at the Anderson-Narvaez Tocobaga Indian site. Based at one of the most historic sites in Pinellas County, visitors to Jungle Prada can enjoy a new indoor exhibition that features artifacts found during archaeological digs that occurred onsite. Outdoors, follow new signage on a self-guided tour of the three-acre property to explore how indigenous cultures lived along

Community Project Grant Application Tips and Tricks

Submitting a successful Community Project Grant application should not be a shot in the dark. Join Florida Humanities Grants Director Lindsey Morrison for a 1-hour webinar that walks attendees through tenets of a successful application, common pitfalls of denied grants, and strategies to ensure your application – and public humanities programming – is the best it can be. This webinar is designed for: a) Applicants recently denied looking to improve

Florida’s Female Pioneers

Celebrate early innovations and advancements brought to us by Florida women! Join us for this virtual presentation by Dr. Peggy Macdonald, noted public historian and author, as she explores a selection of their stories. Hear how Dr. Esther Hill Hawks ran the first racially integrated free school in Florida; how Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, kick-started Florida’s tourism industry with her 1873 book, Palmetto Leaves; and how

State of Water, State of Mind

Amid a scourge of pollution a half-century ago, the United States and Florida passed bedrock water legislation with the Clean Water Act at the federal level and the state’s sweeping water and land-management laws of 1972, some of the strongest in the country. As we approach the fiftieth anniversary of these water laws and celebrate their triumphs, our waters face new challenges. Florida-based author Cynthia Barnett has written four books that span the hydrologic cycle, from freshwater to rain to her new book on the sea, The Sound of the Sea: Seashells and the Fate of the Oceans. In our final “Let’s Talk About Water Lecture,” Barnett, an environmental journalist in residence at the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications, will weave together lessons from the past and new challenges for the future. Her closing lecture, State of Water, State of Mind, reflects on water as Florida’s defining element–and how citizens can get more engaged with our state’s most precious resource.

Florida’s Healing Waters

Rick Kilby will discuss his latest book, Florida’s Healing Waters: Gilded Age Mineral Springs, Seaside Resorts & Health Spas, a historical account of a little-known time in Florida history when tourists poured into the state in search of good health. Kilby will explore the phenomena of “taking the waters” during a golden age of bathing in Florida when the state was a prime destination for visitors seeking restoration and romance

Expanding Waters

Our current waters are rising and getting warmer. They fuel the intensification of hurricanes and the flooding of our lands. Art helps to create a conversation by making the invisible visible. Carol Mickett and Robert Stackhouse, a team of artists, will carry you through their fascination with water and water-related phenomenon and issues through this presentation. You will see some of their early work through to their current work from

The Gulf and The Eagle

The Gulf of Mexico is the ninth-largest body of water in the world. While also a critical space for commercial activity, the gulf also serves as the home for a host of bird and wetland species. Jack E. Davis, Professor of History and Rothman Family Chair in the Humanities at the University of Florida, will share how the Gulf of Mexico plays an integral part of the nation’s environmental story.

Community Project Grant Application Tips and Tricks

Submitting a successful Community Project Grant application should not be a shot in the dark. Join Florida Humanities Grants Director Lindsey Morrison for a 1-hour webinar that walks attendees through tenets of a successful application, common pitfalls of denied grants, and strategies to ensure your application – and public humanities programming – is the best it can be. This webinar is designed for: a) Applicants recently denied looking to improve

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