English for Families In Person Classes

English for Families is a series of classes designed for caregivers and their children ages 6-12. This series focuses on developing English vocabulary and literacy skills through fun and interactive storytelling. Classes will be held at the Betty J. Johnson North Sarasota Public Library (2801 Newtown Blvd.) Registration Required. Participants will receive a variety of resources and books to assist them with their continued language learning after the completion of

The Privilege of Remaining

Join Reflections of Manatee for a critical discussion about the Seminole people and the confrontations fought in Florida that impacted their way of life. Within the Seminole War (1817-28, 1835-42, 1855-58) were two long periods of cease-fire; long enough that Americans saw it as three wars. For the Seminole people in Florida, however, the War was an ever-present threat shaping the way they lived and the way they interacted with

Florida’s Female Pioneers

Join Reflections of Manatee for an in-depth exploration of the founding women of Florida. Dr. Esther Hill Hawks, a female physician, ran the first racially integrated free school in Florida (and probably the nation) after the Civil War. Harriet Beecher Stowe kick-started Florida’s tourism industry with her 1873 book, Palmetto Leaves. Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, the first in her family to be born into freedom, became one of the first

Life in the Shadow of Slavery: Freedom Found by the Manatee River

In the early days of colonial America, enslaved peoples seeking freedom could find a safe haven in Spanish La Florida. Archaeological excavations have revealed facets of daily life for the Maroons of the freedom-seeking community known as Angola by the Manatee Mineral Spring between the 1770s and 1821. Uzi Baram, lead archaeologist, will share the insights from 15 years of research and January 2020 excavations and follow-up laboratory analysis. This

My Sister’s Keeper

Join the New College of Florida for the lecture and discussion, “My Sister’s Keeper.” The dialogue will examine Black women’s history and contemporary practice of resisting and healing from racialized gender oppression and trauma through collective work and the formation of networks of support. The conversation will feature Tosha Alston, founder and artistic director of Ayodele Drum and Dance in Chicago; Dr. Janet Taylor MD, MPH who is a Community

From Angola to Today: A Conversation on History, Race, and Social Justice in Manatee County

From the slave raid that destroyed the maroon community of Angola in 1821, to the enslaved in the village of Manatee, Jim Crow laws, local lynchings, and the Civil Rights movement of the 20th Century, themes of racial injustice are a little known or seldom acknowledged part of Manatee County’s history. A panel of scholars and community leaders will discuss the impacts of this history and how today’s social justice

Campus Conversations: Maternal Health and Women’s Knowledge

Hosted by the New College of Florida, this informal conversation will lay out the stakes of maternal health and birthing experience for Black women and their children in particular, bringing together a historian of medicine and a practicing doula to lead a discussion of these issues and share experiences with the audience. Participants include Amelia Villada, local birth consultant, doula, and Hypnobirthing practitioner in our community, and Dr. Maneesha Lal,

The Healing Drum

The New College of Florida will kick off a series of talks on race, health, and wellness with the “The Healing Drum.” This program features a dialogue among Dr. Kyaien Connor, an associate professor in the Department of Mental Health Law and Policy at the University of South Florida, Tampa; Cheikh N’Dong, Master Drummer and Music Director for Kuumba Dancers and Drummers; and Dr. Hugo Viera-Vargas, an assistant professor in

Rancho Connections – Cuban Fishing Ranchos in Florida

As commercial fleets hailing from ports in Cuba took benefit of fisheries north of the Florida Straits, colonial and territorial frontier politics influenced their operations. Known as Cuban Fishing Ranchos, these places have left an indelible mark on the landscape of Southern Gulf Coast Florida and continue to offer insights of a complicated history. Join Reflections of Manatee to discuss their operations and contemplate where connections remain. This lecture will

Rancho Connections – Cuban Fishing Ranchos in Florida

As commercial fleets hailing from ports in Cuba took benefit of fisheries north of the Florida Straits, colonial and territorial frontier politics influenced their operations. Known as Cuban Fishing Ranchos, these places have left an indelible mark on the landscape of Southern Gulf Coast Florida and continue to offer insights of a complicated history. Join Reflections of Manatee to discuss their operations and contemplate where connections remain. This lecture will

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